Beautiful fall weather this past week was a welcome relief to wheat pasture producers.  Driving around western Oklahoma the past few days confirmed two impressions for me.  First, there is a lot of wheat, some ready to graze and, with the moisture we have received, there will abundant wheat …

Soil nutrients are not even. They are not even across a field and they are not even with soil depth. Nutrients can differ drastically just a few inches of soil away. This is true even in conventionally tilled fields. All this variability makes taking accurate soil samples the most important …

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Combines were out in force this week as corn harvest continued after late season rains created adverse ground conditions. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimated 9 percent harvest completion in Kansas, with 12 percent completion in Missouri and 15 percent completion in Oklahoma.

Crop harvest is an exciting time for most producers. It is often joked that planting, fertilizing and spraying are all done solely for the chance to get to ride around in the combine. Although most farmers take much pride in every farming practice they endeavor in, it’s always nice to get th…

Much of the eastern half of the state is in various stages of drought and has been for a large part of the summer. In many instances in the most severely affected areas, the plants never even developed an ear and that corn has been chopped for silage.  In a recent survey of central Kansas, A…

Wheat is considered a highly responsive crop to starter fertilizers, particularly phosphorus and nitrogen. Application of P as starter fertilizer can be an effective method for part or all the P needs. Wheat plants typically show a significant increase in fall tillers and better root develop…

University of Missouri Extension natural resource engineer Kent Shannon offers tips for collecting farm yield data prior to harvest.

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Cover cropping today is anything but a one-size-fits-all approach or a fix-all fencerow prescription. During statewide Soil Health Sustainability for Cropland workshops, Natural Resource and Conservation Service experts taught producers to tailor soil health strategies to meet individual needs.

Corn is already in reproductive stages in many parts of the state, particularly in eastern Kansas. One of the main challenges presented in the last month, besides the lack of precipitation, was the high night temperatures.

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Despite advances in technology, farmers today face challenges previous generations never anticipated — in addition to the age-old difficulties Mother Nature brings to the table.

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Wheat has had an unpredictable year — facing dry conditions, hail events and temperature extremes. While Four State area combines aren’t done rolling, test weights and protein are running close to average, while yields are slightly low.

Each year charcoal rot unleashes its damaging effects on over 500 plant species in a methodology similar to cancer. By systematically activating enzymes to break down plant tissue, charcoal rot notably affects soybeans, sorghum and corn in a destructive path across Kansas.

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Increasingly positive U.S. market conditions are developing for grain farmers despite turbulent trade negotiations.  Dry conditions in Argentina, late planting in Brazil, and building energy markets are giving economists cause for relief and optimism.

The law of unintended consequences states that the actions of people, especially of government, always have effects that are unanticipated or unintended. Sulfur, one of the essential nutrients for plant growth, is an excellent example of an unintended consequence.

We are nearing the end of the time period to control musk thistles effectively. Musk thistle is primarily a biennial or winter annual species. As a biennial, seed will germinate in the spring or fall and plants remain as rosettes during the entire growing season. Upon surviving a winter, pla…

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Farmers, agronomists and marketing specialists who gathered for the annual wheat tour at the North Central Oklahoma Research Station at Lahoma on May 11 experienced the kind of hot, windy weather that is likely to take a heavy toll on the maturing crop.

As soybean planting approaches, it is important to make early season management decisions to reduce losses from the two most damaging soybean diseases: sudden death syndrome and soybean cyst nematode. The pathogens of both diseases can infect soybean roots shortly after germination, making e…

Recent weather systems have brought rain to many areas of Kansas during the past two weeks. This is a welcome relief from drought conditions that have dominated most of the winter and spring. The wheat crop is at the flag emergence and boot stage of development in the southeast and south cen…

While taped-over webcams, online identity hacking and suspicions of audio monitoring have characterized the way Americans interact with technology, up to this point all of these scenarios have felt distant from rural life and agriculture.  But when a 2018 cyber-security breach hit Facebook u…

This may be the “Charlie Brown” of wheat growing years. A nice warm weather stretch would be equivalent to Charlie confidently approaching the football, but the Mother Nature’s Lucy pulls the football away with record cold temperatures. The question that is on most wheat producers minds is, …

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Following China’s announcement of a proposed 25 percent tariff on imported U.S. soybeans, the American Soybean Association is again expressing its extreme frustration about the escalation of a trade war with the largest customer of U.S. soybeans, and calling on the White House to reconsider …

With the variable weather this spring, many producers are questioning Mother Nature, asking, “Has spring already sprung?” or “Is this a trick and we will be receiving our winter cold later than desired?” The weather this time of year can prove to be very unpredictable, and in some cases, thi…

Think back to your high school math class. Did you ever take an exam that you felt like every answer was a guess? K-State Research and Extension agents, along with some other agencies, fill out crop progress reports on a regular basis with what amounts to an educated guess. However, there is…

One item often overlooked when using variable-rate technology is the calibration of application equipment. Currently, no standard procedures exist for calibrating VRT. While calibration of spreaders, planters and sprayers is needed for uniform application, it is even more critical to calibra…

The days are getting longer and temperatures are giving us all hope for spring. This is also the time of year that producers start asking about the outlook for wheat diseases in Kansas.

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During Kansas State University Extension’s meeting on cover crops, soil health and grazing, held at Rich Falkenstien’s farm in Oswego, Kansas, participants discussed practical no-till practices and their on-farm implications.

Spring is right around the corner. Wheat is starting to green-up rapidly. Lawns are looking greener but if a dear friend is correct, it is the weeds rather than the grass making it that way. There is a perception that we have had a cooler than average winter so I thought I would investigate.

There is a lot of interest this year in second year and even third or more year soybean. If you are thinking about growing continuous soybean this year there are several management decisions you should consider.

Red clover is a short-lived perennial legume, which is widely utilized in Missouri. It is well adapted to the soil and climate of the Midwest. Clover is easy to establish in cool season grass pastures and hay fields because it can withstand shading during the seedling stage better than most …

Controlling marestail in soybeans continues to be a big challenge for Kansas no-till producers. Because soybeans are generally planted later in the season, and marestail generally germinates in the fall or early spring, application timing and weed size are critical factors for successful control.

In conjunction with the Kansas State Ag Economics department last year, the Wildcat Extension District hosted a meeting that focused on 10 considerations to make during a struggling farm economy. Unfortunately, there is not an expected surge in the farm economy for the next growing season, s…

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