Farm Talk

Crops

July 9, 2013

Precision ag conf. slated July 16-18

Parsons, Kansas — The InfoAg Conference is set for July 16-18 at the Crowne Plaza in Springfield, Illinois. InfoAg is the premier conference on precision ag technology and its practical applications. Last InfoAg attendance topped 730 crop advisers, farmers, ag retailers, ag services, state and federal agents, researchers, Extension, and other agribusiness professionals. Attend InfoAg to learn about the latest technologies and how these technologies are being put to use in production agriculture. Visit www.infoag.org for program information and to register.

The InfoAg format features multiple concurrent speaker sessions providing a wide range of topics covering all points of view along the management spectrum from high-level discussions among key executives to boots on the ground decisions in producing a crop. InfoAg’s program format provides a key ingredient in the conference’s success. “We offer a blended program hitting on key aspects of precision ag,” said Dr. Steve Phillips of the International Plant Nutrition Institute. “That program attracts participants from all aspects of the industry, which builds on InfoAg’s strength as a networking tool for participants, speakers, exhibitors and sponsors.”

“The conference provides the ideal environment for meeting the players who are shaping the industry, “ said Quentin Rund, Conference Secretary. “Sharing ideas and talking with others who are facing the same questions or providing answers is the spirit of the conference.” This year the program will offer four concurrent sessions with each speaker getting plenty of time to cover their points in depth and allow time for questions. Phillips said, “We build the program to meet a variety of needs. We hit the hot topics in the industry. We invite speakers who set the stage for the future uses of tomorrow’s tools. But we also want to be sure we provide examples of how to put the technology into practice. By featuring retailers, crop consultants and farmers who are actively using information, tools, and technology in their operation we set InfoAg apart by connecting the dots throughout the industry.”

The program also allows for plenty of time for networking. Breaks, lunches, and evening receptions will be in the expanded exhibit hall. This gives participants opportunity to follow up with speakers, meet other attendees, and see the latest products and services from the world’s leading precision ag vendors.

CropLife will once again manage the InfoAg Exhibit Hall. “CropLife knows the players in the industry and their relationships with vendors is another key to the success of the conference,” said Rund. “The partnership with CropLife allows IPNI to focus on the program content,” said Phillips.

Working with the Crowne Plaza, InfoAg expanded the exhibit hall to the whole Plaza function area. This year the Exhibit Hall features 101 booths, a 25 percent increase, as well as all food and beverage functions. The Exhibitor Prospectus is now available on the conference Website, www.infoag.org.

Sponsorship opportunities also are now available. InfoAg sponsorships contribute to the success of the conference through their financial support, but also through their contribution to the program. The Sponsor Showcase will be one of the four tracks offered this year. Sponsors are offered time on the program based on their level of support. The Sponsor Showcase continues to be a great way to promote a new product or service. “Participants flock to the Sponsor Showcase sessions because they know they are going to see the latest greatest offerings from a company or a new product or service unveiled for the first time,” said Rund. £

 

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Crops
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