Farm Talk

Crops

January 7, 2014

Sides weighing in on 2,4-D tolerant seeds

Parsons, Kansas — Associated Press

MILWAUKEE (AP) —The U.S. government has proposed eliminating restrictions on the use of corn and soybean seeds that are genetically engineered to resist 2,4-D, a move welcomed by many farmers but feared by environmentalists who worry it could invite growers to use more chemicals.

Dow AgroSciences has asked the USDA to deregulate one corn and two soybean varieties, all resistant to both 2,4-D and glyphosate.

The herbicide has had limited use in corn and soybeans because it becomes toxic to the plants early in their growth. The new seeds would allow farmers to use the weed killer throughout the plants' lives.

Farmers have been eager for a new generation of herbicide-resistant seeds because of the prevalence of weeds that have become immune to glyphosate. But skeptics are concerned that use of the new seeds and 2,4-D will lead to similar problems as weeds acquire resistance to that chemical.

``It's just so clear. You can see that you have this pesticide treadmill effect,'' said Bill Freese, a chemist with the Washington, D.C.-based Center For Food Safety, which promotes organic agriculture.

Most corn and soybeans grown in the U.S. are already genetically engineered. Before Roundup was introduced in 1976, most farmers tilled their fields prior to planting, flipping the soil over and burying the weeds to kill them. The technique also exposed tilled earth to the air, creating problems with erosion and runoff.

Herbicide-resistant seeds permitted most farmers to stop tilling because they could spray fields after plants emerged, killing the weeds but leaving crops unharmed.

The new generation of plants ``allowed us to do a better job of controlling the weeds, and therefore, we've been able to do a better job of preserving the soil, which is our primary natural resource,'' said Ron Moore, who grows 2,000 acres of corn and soybeans with his brother in western Illinois.

USDA's plant-inspection agency concluded the greatest risk from the new seeds developed by Dow AgroSciences was increased use of 2,4-D, which could hasten the evolution of weeds resistant to it.

But, the agency said, resistance could develop anyway because 2,4-D is the third most-used weed-killer in America.

Freese and other advocates also raised concerns about possible health risks from increased use of 2,4-D and the chemical's tendency to drift beyond the area where it is sprayed, threatening neighboring crops and wild plants.

Dow AgroSciences has  addressed that by developing a new version of 2,4-D and new equipment to use with it, company spokes-man Garry Hamlin said.

The seeds and new 2,4-D have been approved in Canada but not yet sold there. The company has targeted their release in the U.S. for 2015, pending approval by various federal agencies. In anticipation of that, it has received import approval from seven nations and has applications pending in about six others to allow farmers who use the seeds sold under the Enlist brand to export their crops.

For now, Dow AgroSciences' seeds can only be used in tightly controlled trials.

The Center for Food Safety and the environmental group Earthjustice threatened legal action if restrictions are lifted.

The Environmental Protection Agency is conducting a separate review on the impact of expanded use of 2,4-D, although it previously found the herbicide safe. £

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