Farm Talk

Crops

October 9, 2012

Ag pesticide disposal sites set in Oklahoma

Parsons, Kansas — Oklahoma agricultural producers, commercial and non-commercial applicators and pesticide dealers can get rid of unwanted pesticides in November, courtesy of the Oklahoma Unwanted Pesticide Disposal Program.

Collection services will take place 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., November 13, in Sayre at the Beckham County Fairgrounds, and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., November 15, in Dewey at the Washington County Fairgrounds.  

The program is funded by the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry, with additional support from the Oklahoma Agribusiness Retailers Association and the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service.

ODAFF has contracted with Clean Harbors, a licensed hazardous waste company, to collect and properly dispose of waste pesticides in Oklahoma. To date, nearly 660,000 pounds of unwanted pesticides have been collected and disposed of since the program began in 2006.

“The intent of the November collection service is not to prosecute participants for illegal management practices but to reduce potential health and environmental concerns by removing unwanted pesticides from storage,” said Ryan Williams, ODAFF Consumer Protection Services.

Unwanted pesticides are those that are unusable as originally intended for a variety of reasons, including leftover pesticides, pesticides that are no longer registered in Oklahoma and pesticides that no longer have labels or are no longer identifiable.

“We will accept commercial and farm-type pesticides, as well as those typically used by homeowners,” said Charles Luper, Cooperative Extension associate with the Oklahoma State University Pesticide Safety Education Program. “Other items such as paint, batteries and oil also will not be accepted.”

There is no cost for the first 2,500 pounds of pesticides brought in by a participant. A $1 per pound charge will be instituted for additional amounts of pesticide brought by a participant, with the exception of mercury based products, which will cost $2.22 per pound per participant.

“Liquid pesticides weigh approximately 10 pounds per gallon,” Luper said.

Clean Harbors will accept payment in the form of a check or credit card at the disposal site. Cash will not be accepted.

Applicators and agricultural producers are not required to pre-register. Dealers are asked to pre-register with Clean Harbors through the OSU Pesticide Safety Education Program at http://pested.okstate.edu/unwanted.htm on the Internet.

“Dealers are asked to pre-register because of the potential for large quantities of pesticides coming from multiple dealers or multiple locations,” Luper said. “Pre-registration will help Clean Harbors know what will be needed on-site to effectively handle collection amounts.”

For additional information, visit the OSU Pesticide Safety Education Program site on the Internet or contact Luper at 405-744-5808 or Williams at 405-522-5993. £

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