Farm Talk

Ag News from Around the Country

April 5, 2011

Emergency plans are vital to protect farms

Parsons, Kansas — Every farm should have a disaster plan to protect assets from natural disasters and other emergencies, said a Kansas State University Extension communication specialist.

Producers should also develop a disaster plan as a way to find potential problems that could prove to be costly in the event of an on-farm emergency, said Mary Lou Peter, who also serves as K-State Research and Extension’s point of contact with the Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN).

EDEN is a collaborative multi-state effort by Extension services across the country to reduce the impact of disasters through education.

“Creating a plan helps producers find risks they may have overlooked or not thought about,” Peter said.

Disaster planning starts with identifying high on-farm risks and acknowledging past emergencies. In many states, the most common natural disasters are floods, straight-line winds, fires and winter storms.

Crop insurance can be one of the best ways to protect income if field crops become damaged. Farm disaster planning should include an analysis to determine if crop insurance is best for a particular farm. Peter also recommends producers take risk mitigation steps, such as buying a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration weather radio, labeling all truck and equipment keys, resolving electrical issues and cataloging assets that could be damaged.

Farmers, like other business owners, should back up computers and use off-site storage for electronic and hard copy records that are irreplaceable and easily protected but often forgotten. Peter suggests inviting emergency personnel to visit farm properties and help determine major risks. For example, this might help firefighters understand how to respond to a fire at a specific farm.

“If there is a fire near chemicals, it may be better to let it burn out rather than using water,” she said. “Thinking through these steps before an emergency can help farmers avoid the environmental issues with chemicals getting into the groundwater.”

Once in place, disaster plans should be reviewed and exercised at least once a year.

“It does not have to be an elaborate exercise,” Peter said. “Just ask questions about who is going to execute certain tasks. When disaster strikes, it won't be the plan that saves lives and money, it will be the thought process and experience gained knowing the plan.”

The hardest part about creating a disaster plan can be taking the time to write it down, but two publications developed by Purdue University Extension can help, she said.

“Plan Today for Tomorrow's Flood” is a flood response plan for agricultural retailers but which farmers also can use. “Rural Security Planning” is designed to protect family, friends and farms in the event of an emergency. Both publications are available for free download from Purdue Extension at The Education Store at mdc.itap.pur due.edu/. Hard copies are available for $1 each.

“Using the publications and common sense, a producer can have a farm-ready emergency plan in about three hours,” Peter said.

More information for farmers and others about emergency preparedness and disaster recovery is available at www.exten sion.org (click on disaster issues) and www.eden.lsu. edu. More information for Kansas is available at www.kseden.ksu.edu.

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